Structural aspects of displacive transformations: What can optical microscopy contribute? Dehydration of Sm 2 (C 2 O 4) 3 ·10H 2 O as a case study

Alexander A. Matvienko, Daniel V. Maslennikov, Boris A. Zakharov, Anatoly A. Sidelnikov, Stanislav A. Chizhik, Elena V. Boldyreva

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

For martensitic transformations the macroscopic crystal strain is directly related to the corresponding structural rearrangement at the microscopic level. In situ optical microscopy observations of the interface migration and the change in crystal shape during a displacive single crystal to single crystal transformation can contribute significantly to understanding the mechanism of the process at the atomic scale. This is illustrated for the dehydration of samarium oxalate decahydrate in a study combining optical microscopy and single-crystal X-ray diffraction.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)588-597
Number of pages10
JournalIUCrJ
Volume4
Issue numberPt 5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2017

Keywords

  • crystal morphology
  • martensitic transformations
  • materials modelling
  • optical microscopy
  • phase transitions
  • properties of solids
  • solid-state chemical reactions
  • thermomechanical effects
  • topotactic transformations
  • HIGH-PRESSURE
  • MOLECULAR-STRUCTURE
  • L-SERINE
  • CRYSTAL PHASE-TRANSITION
  • ELECTRON-MICROSCOPY
  • NEGATIVE THERMAL-EXPANSION
  • OXALATE
  • RARE-EARTH CARBOXYLATES
  • SINGLE-CRYSTAL
  • METAL-ORGANIC FRAMEWORKS

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