Specific chemical approaches for studying mammalian ribosomes complexed with ligands involved in selenoprotein synthesis

Olga Kossinova, Alexey Malygin, Alain Krol, Galina Karpova

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Chemical approaches are very powerful tools for investigating the molecular structure and architecture of large ribonucleoprotein complexes involving ribosomes and other components of the translation system. Application of RNA nucleotide-specific and cross-linking reagents of a broad specificity range allows the researcher to obtain information on the sites of ligand binding to the ribosome and to each other as well as on the RNA rearrangements caused by the binding. Here, we describe specific chemical approaches including chemical probing and site-directed or bifunctional reagent-mediated cross-linking, which have been used for exploring the mechanism of selenocysteine insertion into a polypeptide chain by mammalian ribosomes.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationMethods in Molecular Biology
EditorsL Chavatte
PublisherHumana Press Inc.
Pages73-92
Number of pages20
Volume1661
ISBN (Electronic)978-1-4939-7258-6
ISBN (Print)978-1-4939-7257-9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2018

Publication series

NameMethods in molecular biology (Clifton, N.J.)
ISSN (Print)1064-3745

Keywords

  • Chemical modification
  • Chemical probing
  • Cross-linking
  • Ribosome
  • RNA
  • Selenocysteine
  • Selenoprotein
  • RNA, Ribosomal/chemistry
  • Protein Biosynthesis
  • Selenocysteine/chemistry
  • Humans
  • RNA-Binding Proteins/genetics
  • Ribosomal Proteins/metabolism
  • Selenoproteins/biosynthesis
  • Ribosome Subunits/chemistry
  • Animals
  • Cell-Free System
  • Ribosomes/chemistry
  • Protein Binding
  • Ligands
  • CONTACTS
  • TRANSLATION
  • SELENOCYSTEINE INSERTION
  • SBP2
  • SELENIUM
  • UGA
  • RNA-BINDING PROTEIN
  • MESSENGER-RNAS
  • BIOSYNTHESIS

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Specific chemical approaches for studying mammalian ribosomes complexed with ligands involved in selenoprotein synthesis'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this