Optical spectroscopy as a tool for battery research

Thomas Köhler, Juliane Hanzig, Victor Koroteev

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The following compendium reviews the development and establishment of optical spectroscopy as an analytical method for battery material components and electrochemical reactions. The interaction of light with matter is a sensitive and non-destructive way to characterize any sample state, i.e. solids, liquids or gases. Special attention is devoted to infrared and ultraviolet spectroscopy, covering a wavelength range from 12 μm to 200 nm, as well as Raman scattering spectroscopy, in order to excite different vibrational/rotational lattice modes and transitions of valence electrons. This allows an insight into structural properties, chemical composition, oxidation states or kinetic processes. The development of spectroelectrochemical in situ cells allows the investigation of various battery components, e.g. working and counter electrode, separator, electrolyte as well as interfaces between these components. These powerful tools allow the evaluation of the functionality, stability and safety aspects of an electrochemical storage cell.

Original languageEnglish
Article number20170154
Number of pages14
JournalPhysical Sciences Reviews
Volume4
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2019

Keywords

  • battery materials
  • Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy
  • in situ spectroscopy
  • intercalation
  • Raman spectroscopy
  • solid electrolyte interface (SEI)
  • surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)
  • tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS)
  • UV/Vis spectroscopy
  • PROPYLENE CARBONATE
  • SOLID-ELECTROLYTE INTERPHASE
  • FTIR SPECTROSCOPY
  • VINYLENE CARBONATE
  • DEPTH RESOLUTION
  • GRAPHITIC MATERIALS
  • LI-INTERCALATION
  • LITHIUM-ION BATTERIES
  • IN-SITU RAMAN
  • ETHYLENE CARBONATE

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