Abstract

Na-Ca carbonates synthesized in high-pressure experiments and found in mineral inclusions inside diamonds, exhumed from mantle depths, attract a lot of attention as potential hosts of subducted CO2 in the deep mantle and sources of carbonate-rich magmas, involved in mantle metasomatism and diamond formation. However, the Na-Ca carbonates synthesized at pressures of mantle transition zone (13–24 GPa) were not characterized structurally or spectroscopically. At the same time, the stability of well-characterized Na-Ca carbonates synthesized at lower pressures (3–6 GPa) at higher pressures was never studied in in situ experiments. Here, we report an in situ Raman study of Na-Ca burbankite, Na2Ca4(CO3)5, synthesized at 6 GPa using diamond anvil cell technique up to the pressures of 24 GPa, corresponding to the mantle transition zone. The obtained results link the observations from experiments corresponding both to the upper mantle and mantle transition zone by demonstration of structural stability of Na-Ca burbankite and the absence of phase transitions up to 24 GPa (at least at ambient temperature). The latter allows to preliminary assign the Na-Ca-carbonates synthesized in carbonated pelites and eclogites under pressures of mantle transition zone to the burbankite structural type.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)101-106
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Raman Spectroscopy
Volume54
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2023

Keywords

  • burbankite
  • carbonate
  • deep carbon cycle
  • diamond anvil cell
  • high pressure

OECD FOS+WOS

  • 2.05 MATERIALS ENGINEERING
  • 1.04 CHEMICAL SCIENCES

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