Geochronology and Geochemistry of Small Granitoid Intrusions in the Western Yana–Kolyma Gold Belt (Northeast Asia)

V. Yu Fridovsky, A. E. Vernikovskaya, K. Yu Yakovleva, V. A. Vernikovsky, V. N. Rodionov

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Data on the petrographic–geochemical and U–Th–Pb geochronological studies of granitoids of the Bukeschensky and Samyrsky massifs of small intrusions complex of the western part of the Yana–Kolyma gold belt are reported. The granitoids intruded terrigenous rocks of the Kular–Nera and Polousniy–Debin terranes and the Verkhoyansk fold and thrust belt. According to the U–Pb geochronological data obtained on zircons (SIMS SHRIMP-II), the granitoids were formed in the Early Cretaceous, in the interval of 144.5–143 Ma. Their geochemical characteristics are similar to the associated Late Jurassic (151–145 Ma) dikes of various composition of the Nera–Bokhapcha complex. The granitoids could have been formed from a mixed source with the participation of mantle (OIB- and E-MORB-type), subduction, or crustal components. The intrusion into the Early Cretaceous granitoids probably contributed to the final processes of migration and localization of gold in the Yana–Kolyma belt. Systems of tectonic faults of different orders, such as longitudinal (northwestern), Adycha–Taryn and others, and faults transverse to them (northeastern), also played in favor of this process.

Translated title of the contributionГеохронология и геохимия гранитоидов малых интрузий западной части Яно-Колымского золотоносного пояса (северо-восток Азии)
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)14-20
Number of pages7
JournalDoklady Earth Sciences
Volume502
Issue number1-2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2022

Keywords

  • granitoids
  • Northeast Asia
  • U–Pb geochronology
  • Yana–Kolyma gold belt

OECD FOS+WOS

  • 1.05 EARTH AND RELATED ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

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