Directed evolution as a tool for the selection of oncolytic RNA viruses with desired phenotypes

Sergei S. Zaindiutnov, Galina Kochneva, Sergei Netesov, Peter M. Chumakov, Olga Matveeva

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

Abstract

Viruses have some characteristics in common with cell-based life. They can evolve and adapt to environmental conditions. Directed evolution can be used by researchers to produce viral strains with desirable phenotypes. Through bioselection, improved strains of oncolytic viruses can be obtained that have better safety profiles, increased specificity for malignant cells, and more efficient spread among tumor cells. It is also possible to select strains capable of killing a broader spectrum of cancer cell variants, so as to achieve a higher frequency of therapeutic responses. This review describes and analyses virus adaptation studies performed with members of four RNA virus families that are used for viral oncolysis: reoviruses, paramyxoviruses, enteroviruses, and rhabdoviruses.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)9-26
Number of pages18
JournalOncolytic Virotherapy
Volume8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 12 Jul 2019

Keywords

  • oncolytic viruses
  • virus selection
  • virus adaptation
  • directed viral evolution
  • NEWCASTLE-DISEASE VIRUS
  • RECOMBINANT SENDAI-VIRUS
  • HUMAN-MELANOMA TUMORS
  • VESICULAR STOMATITIS-VIRUS
  • OUTER CAPSID PROTEINS
  • SIALIC-ACID
  • MAMMALIAN ORTHOREOVIRUS
  • COXSACKIEVIRUS A21
  • REOVIRUS VARIANTS
  • IN-VIVO

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