BATS (CHIROPTERA) AND OTHER SMALL MAMMALS (RODENTIA, LAGOMORPHA, CARNIVORA) FROM THE PLEISTOCENE SITE TRLICA (MONTENEGRO): BIOSTRATIGRAPHICAL AND PALEOECOLOGICAL IMPLICATIONS

Valentina V. Rosina, Alexander K. Agadjanian, Mikhail V. Shunkov

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Two bats, Rhinolophus cf. macrorhinus anomalidens and Myotis blythii longocaninus are reported for the first time from the Paleolithic site of Trlica in Montenegro. In addition, the previous list of small mammals from Trlica is now supplemented by Cricetus praeglacialis, Cricetulus sp., Mimomys pliocaenicus, M. ex gr. savini, Terricola sp., Lagurus ex gr. transiens, Microtus nivaloides, Pliolagus sp., Martes sp. and small Vulpes sp. Based on the faunal composition, the lower layers of the Trlica site, which yielded the bat remains, should be dated to the Early Pleistocene. The upper layers are referred to the early Middle Pleistocene. The majority of the small mammal remains apparently come from pellets of birds of prey. In contrast, the scarcity of fossil bat remains could indicate their accumulation as a result of natural death. According to our analysis of the mammal fauna, the climate in the studied area in the Early Pleistocene was relatively cool. It became milder at the beginning of the Middle Pleistocene and the forest (presumably a broad-leaved forest) increased. However, local steppe areas in the northern part of Montenegro persisted during the Early and early Middle Pleistocene and large areas were covered with shrub.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)353-367
Number of pages15
JournalQuaternaire
Volume27
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2016
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Small mammals
  • Chiroptera
  • Rodentia
  • Lagomorpha
  • Carnivora
  • Montenegro
  • Pleistocene
  • Biharian
  • MIDDLE PLEISTOCENE
  • EVOLUTION
  • QUATERNARY
  • PLIOCENE
  • BIOCHRONOLOGY
  • TERTIARY
  • HOTSPOTS
  • FAUNAS
  • BASIN

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