Association between the effects of high temperature on fertility and sleep in female intra-specific hybrids of Drosophila melanogaster

Lyudmila P. Zakharenko, Dmitriy V. Petrovskii, Nataliya V. Dorogova, Arcady A. Putilov

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Humans and fruit flies demonstrate similarity in sleep-wake behavior, e.g., in the pattern of sleep disturbances caused by an exposure to high temperature. Although research has provided evidence for a clear connection between sleeping problems and infertility in women, very little is known regarding the mechanisms underlying this connection. Studies of dysgenic crosses of fruit flies revealed that an exposure to elevated temperature induces sterility in female intra-specific hybrids exclusively in one of two cross directions (progeny of Canton-S females crossed with Harwich males). Given the complexity and limitations of human studies, this fruit flies’ model of temperature-sensitive sterility might be used for testing whether the effects of high temperature on fertility and on 24-h sleep pattern are inter-related. To document this pattern, 315 hybrids were kept for at least five days in constant darkness at 20 °C and 29 °C. No evidence was found for a causal link between sterility and sleep disturbance. However, a diminished thermal responsiveness of sleep was shown by females with temperature-induced sterility, while significant responses to high temperature were still observed in fertile females obtained by crossing in the opposite direction (i.e., Canton-S males with Harwich females) and in fertile males from either cross.

Original languageEnglish
Article number336
JournalInsects
Volume12
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2021

Keywords

  • Fruit fly model
  • Infertility
  • Reproductive health
  • Sleep disorders

OECD FOS+WOS

  • 1.06.IY ENTOMOLOGY

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