Active tectonics and paleoseismicity of the eastern issyk-kul basin (Kyrgyzstan, Tien Shan)

A. M. Korzhenkov, E. V. Deev, I. V. Turova, S. V. Abdieva, S. S. Ivanov, J. Liu, I. V. Mažeika, E. A. Rogozhin, A. A. Strelnikov, A. B. Fortuna, M. T. Usmanova

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The Malyi Orgochor, Orgochor, Birbash, Sukhoi Ridge, Ichketosma, and Tosma uplifts in the eastern Issyk-Kul basin are fault-related anticlinal folds composed of Neogene and Quaternary sediments involved in tectonic movements. The folds have asymmetric transversal profiles, with low-angle southern limbs and steep northern limbs cut by segments of the South Issyk-Kul and Karkara reverse faults reactivated in the late Quaternary. The location and geometry of the two faults, which both show reverse and left-lateral strike slip components, correspond to neotectonic propagation of deformation from the Terskey-Ala-Too Range over almost the whole eastern Issyk-Kul basin. Judging by primary and secondary coseismic surface deformation in the area, the South Issyk-Kul and Karkara faults repeatedly generated large earthquakes (M ≥ 7, I ≥ 9) in the Late Pleistocene and Holocene. According to trenching results, the historical earthquakes that occurred in the first and 10–11th centuries accommodated motions on the South Issyk-Kul fault. The new seismotectonic and paleo-seismicity data from the eastern Issyk-Kul basin provide updates to its seismic potential.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)263-277
Number of pages15
JournalRussian Geology and Geophysics
Volume62
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2021

Keywords

  • Eastern Issyk-Kul basin
  • Fault scarps
  • Intrabasinal uplifts
  • Karkara fault
  • Large paleoearthquakes
  • Northern Tien Shan
  • Seismites
  • South Issyk-Kul fault

OECD FOS+WOS

  • 1.05 EARTH AND RELATED ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES
  • 1.05.KY GEOLOGY
  • 1.05.GC GEOCHEMISTRY & GEOPHYSICS

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